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Effect of exercise versus joint mobilization on pain, function, and range of motion in patients with adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder.


Description

The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of exercise versus joint mobilization in the treatment of shoulder adhesive capsulitis by measuring pain, function, and range of motion. Thirty subjects were randomly assigned into two groups of 15. Subjects received either exercise or joint mobilization three times a week for 4 weeks. Numeric pain scale, Simple Shoulder Test (SST), active internal rotation (IR) scores, and passive goniometric range of motion (ROM) measures were recorded pre- and posttreatment. No significant differences were found between the groups comparing pain, SST, and active IR scores (Mann-Whitney U) or passive ROM (repeated measures MANOVA). However, significant improvement was found within groups comparing pre- to posttest scores of pain, SST, and active IR (Wilcoxon Signed rank tests) and measures of passive ROM. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that either exercise or joint mobilization are equally effective interventions for use in patients with shoulder adhesive capsulitis.